2345434567

Материал из Антэкология /// Anthecology
(перенаправлено с «10.1007/BF00333218»)
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Anemophilous Plants Select Pollen from Their Own Species from the Air
Oecologia, . V. 108. No. 1. P. 8587 (3).
In wind-tunnel experiments, Niklas (1985) has demonstrated the ability of anemophilous plants to select pollen from their own species from the airstream. However, there have been no field experiments to establish whether this operates in nature. We surveyed the pollents on the stigmas of four different, coextensive, dioecious anemophilous species surrounded by a Pinus radiata plantation. The alien pine pollen was overrepresented relative to background levels on only one of the four species. For all three indigenous species with both male and female plants in the area, the highest proportion — in all cases more than 40% — of the pollen found on their stigmas came from their own species. One indigenous species lacked male plants in the area; consequently, the results from this species are difficult to interpret. However, for all four species, there was at least 15% pine pollen, and some pollen of other indigenous species. These results suggest that there is some pollen selection, but that the mechanisms are may be not as effective as Niklas has suggested.
Anemophilous Plants Select Pollen from Their Own Species from the Air
Linder H.P., Midgley J.J.
Oecologia, 1996. V. 108. No. 1. P. 85–87 (3).
In wind-tunnel experiments, Niklas (1985) has demonstrated the ability of anemophilous plants to select pollen from their own species from the airstream. However, there have been no field experiments to establish whether this operates in nature. We surveyed the pollents on the stigmas of four different, coextensive, dioecious anemophilous species surrounded by a Pinus radiata plantation. The alien pine pollen was overrepresented relative to background levels on only one of the four species. For all three indigenous species with both male and female plants in the area, the highest proportion — in all cases more than 40% — of the pollen found on their stigmas came from their own species. One indigenous species lacked male plants in the area; consequently, the results from this species are difficult to interpret. However, for all four species, there was at least 15% pine pollen, and some pollen of other indigenous species. These results suggest that there is some pollen selection, but that the mechanisms are may be not as effective as Niklas has suggested.
AID: 2345434567
DOI: 10.1007/BF00333218