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Материал из Антэкология /// Anthecology
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A test of pollinator specificity and morphological convergence between nectarivorous birds and rainforest tree flowers in New Guinea
Oecologia, . V. 103. No. 1. P. 89100 (12).
Interactions between flowering trees in a representative sample of vegetation, and the birds that fed at their flowers, were studied for 2 years in lowland tropical hill forest in New Guinea. All 2,200 trees in a 3-ha plot were tagged, identified, mapped, and monitored monthly. Approximately 60% of all individual trees flowered during the study; all species that these flowering individuals belonged to were evaluated for bird visitation. Approximately 13% of the 164 resident species of New Guinea avifauna at the study site, especially honeyeaters and parrots, visited flowers. In the forest inventory plot, approximately 15–22% of all 86 tree species that flowered during the study were visited by birds; most of these tree species were canopy species. Results showed that there was no statistically significant correlation between bird species grouped by bill morphology and flower species grouped as morphotypes and ranked by nectar accessibility, although strong but unexpected bird/plant associations were evident. These associations may be related to variables such as body mass or perch size. These results are discussed in comparison with results from the Neotropics and Australia, and in terms of morphological convergence and pollinator specificity in pollination systems.
A test of pollinator specificity and morphological convergence between nectarivorous birds and rainforest tree flowers in New Guinea
Oecologia, 1995. V. 103. No. 1. P. 89–100 (12).
Interactions between flowering trees in a representative sample of vegetation, and the birds that fed at their flowers, were studied for 2 years in lowland tropical hill forest in New Guinea. All 2,200 trees in a 3-ha plot were tagged, identified, mapped, and monitored monthly. Approximately 60% of all individual trees flowered during the study; all species that these flowering individuals belonged to were evaluated for bird visitation. Approximately 13% of the 164 resident species of New Guinea avifauna at the study site, especially honeyeaters and parrots, visited flowers. In the forest inventory plot, approximately 15–22% of all 86 tree species that flowered during the study were visited by birds; most of these tree species were canopy species. Results showed that there was no statistically significant correlation between bird species grouped by bill morphology and flower species grouped as morphotypes and ranked by nectar accessibility, although strong but unexpected bird/plant associations were evident. These associations may be related to variables such as body mass or perch size. These results are discussed in comparison with results from the Neotropics and Australia, and in terms of morphological convergence and pollinator specificity in pollination systems.
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